Last season, the Pawn Masters carefully examined a vintage photograph singed by all four Beatles - But was it authentic? Watch to find out!

See more videos here.

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Vintage Scout Memorabilia!

February 22nd is forever embedded in my memory. As a little girl I was part of the Girl Scout movement, and its founder Robert Baden-Powell, along with his wife Olave, both celebrate their birthdays on this very day.

The Scout uniform is known for its earthy colours and accessories, including patches and a pocket knife. And vintage uniforms have been known to increase in value - the collection above is selling for over $300. Do you have any vintage Scout memorabilia? It could be worth something! Bring it to Pawnathon Canada this March.

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Hell bent for leather.  Tight pants, goggles, beautiful lines and simple elegance.  If you deny the romance of skinny ties, ’60s London cafe culture and the charm of a seductive imbalance of daring to sense, then you’re no friend of mine.

Back in the day the boys would hoist a Tetley’s or two, flex for the pixies and flips, crush a Silk Cut and then hop on their bikes pell-mell for a 100mph tour of the British cafe scene.  Leave a cafe and pull a round-trip flyby of a spot down the street before the jukebox changes songs; rush in victorious in your survival and speed, hair grease beaded with sweat and residual fear - without a doubt girls are swooning, even if they feign indifference in front of their friends; secretly they adore your daredevilry and want to palm you their phone numbers.

God help me I was born a single decade too late and on the wrong continent, but I get it.  I dig the way these men lived and I love that they’re immortalized on hand-illustrated posters right alongside the proper racers from the ’20s, 30s and 40s.  Get me a handmade cafe racer for my birthday and you’ll be at the very top of my list, just saying.

To save you a bit of research you can start the process at Falcon Motorcycles; or Kott Cycles; or Benjie’s Cafe Racers.  These guys are building and restoring motorcycles and they’re my new heroes.  So before my birthday do two things for me please: scour the countryside looking for the proverbial ‘barn find’ vintage cycle (and then bring it on down to us so we can appraise it for you…and maybe buy it), and when you have a few minutes revel in “The Wall of Death”…

http://vimeo.com/32493819

It brings back a little of the free-spiritedness of bygone days.

(Source: megadeluxe.com)

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"Here, hold my trophy while I kiss your girlfriend"

You play the game to see who’s better on any given outing. 

Barcelona bests Valencia 90 times out of 100 but for ten meetings in there, the underdogs ‘get the girl.’  The Giants beat the Patriots but they play that game again tomorrow it’s a different story, and so on and so forth.

True, it’s gut wrenching for the players but for the cheering sections this up and down and back and forth will continue on until sport is no more, and that’s what we really want.  

Mind you, if you do hoist the trophy or the cup what likely follows in the off-season is the anticipation of sliding a lasting tribute to the team’s prowess onto your hand in the form of a monstrous, gem-encrusted gold ring.  I’ve not seen a single example I could wear - and not because of my modesty with the bling factor but because I don’t have fingers large enough in diameter to support it. 

It would take a ball of yarn wrapped around the bottom of the ring to make it anywhere close to something I could pull off; I’m not 6’5” 250lbs and a pro athlete so perhaps that’s where the trouble lies.

But you don’t have to be either to appreciate the modern championship ring.  With the advent of sports memorabilia dealers all it takes is a checkbook and a bit of luck to own one of these treasures, and these days it is big business.  If you’ve ever wondered how these pieces were made this video of the Chicago Blackhawks ring is something you’ll want to watch. 

And then you’ll want to call your uncle who played ball for some college team you can’t remember but that won a championship way back when.  If he’s still wearing his ‘trophy’’ and you’re his favorite maybe he’ll let you bring it on down to Pawnathon – we’re buying gold and victories alike. 

(Source: youtu.be)

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So the other day I was visiting with my Mom and she informed me that I have about 150 comics in a big box at my Dad’s office.  She declined my invitation for her to go through and catalog them for me (sort of short sighted of her if you ask me) which means that they’ll sit in a box a bit longer and I’ll wonder just how much money I have floating around an office in south Texas.

For arguments sake, if I have an Amazing Fantasy #15 (introduction of Spider-Man) or an Action Comics #1 (Superman’s first appearance) squirreled away in there, I’m telling you right now my first phone call will be Sotheby’s and the next is the Saint James Paris where my wife and I will be staying for the next month.  Upon our return we’ll pay cash for a house in a tony neighborhood.

I spent my childhood vacuuming our house and raking leaves around the neighborhood only to spend $.40 a clip acquiring all these books; felt like money well-spent back then.  If the box holds rarities I’ll have been an 11-year-old genius, if it’s a stack of ‘Swamp Thing’ and ‘Vampirella’ books, not so much.  

I’ll keep you posted.  Meantime, take a look in your attic or your basement, call your parents and tell them to hang onto all your old comics, they might be worth dramatically more than you imagined.  And if you find one call us, we’d love to see it and possibly take it off your hands for cash.

(Source: youtu.be)

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We all know fashion trends repeat themselves in cycles, which is why a 1920’s flapper dress is worth more today then it was yesteryear. My grandmother’s closet is full of beautiful, intricate garments, some of which are worth hundreds I’m sure. Do you or someone you know have a similar closet? Let us appraise your vintage frocks for FREE on Pawnathon Canada.

Source: DaisyandStella, via Etsy.

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Momentum Mori - “Remember your mortality”, you too shall perish and all of your worldly treasures will be returned from whence they came.

Can’t you just picture a 15th century clergyman gravely cautioning his parishioners against taking too much pleasure in the physical objects of life?  I hear what he’s saying but he wasn’t tempted by Hermes, the Ritz Carlton and complicated wristwatches.  Let’s be honest, ain’t nothing wrong with cashmere…perhaps we can get special dispensation and enjoy things a little bit.

Truth be known the very artwork that extolled the virtues of frugal, pious living (Vanitas) is now itself collectible and commanding big money.  What was once just a scary painting in your grandparent’s house of skulls, drooping flowers, clocks and bubbles is now a priceless treasure, as are pen and ink drawings of dancing skeletons and the grim reaper.

If you’ve got artwork on paper that you’ve been storing in a file because it’s too weird to look at, dig it out and bring it to us, we’d love to see it and find it a good home…it needs to be the creepy artwork in someone else’s childhood.  In the meantime, if you’re interested in learning more about the symbolism of Vanitas go here for a primer.

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If a 15-year-old girl had become the queen of England and now three years on you wanted to do something special for her, what would it be?  You’d curtsey and then you’d make the world’s first adhesive postage stamp of her likeness. But then what if you also really wanted to acknowledge the unusual construction of a giraffe?  You’d get an engraver to make a portrait, you’d print a whole bunch of ‘em and then you’d send that giraffe around the world.  

Alright, but what about honoring a president, of the invention of flight, or the sentiment of LOVE?  Stamps for each and every one and for every momentous occasion, achievement or noted personality in between.

If you’re a fan of philately (or if you just like saying the word) you’ve no doubt dug through all of your old love letters, or notes from your grandparents, or maybe even notes from their grandparents to see if a prized stamp is lurking on some long forgotten envelope.  

And at some point along the way you might have noticed that the names of stamps make them sound like you’re searching for birds…expensive birds, but cool names just the same: a 1918 ‘Inverted Jenny’, the Swedish Treskilling Yellow, the Mauritius Two Penny Blue, the Franklin “Z-Grill”.

So if you’re haunting flea markets, attics, drawers or antique shows and you find envelopes that look even remotely old, bring ‘em on down and we’ll give the right corner the once over…and then we’ll pay you.

(Source: famousstamps.org)

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I’ve never met an animal I didn’t like which might explain why I was so fascinated with the feet/paws of several tables in my grandparent’s house; I spent an inordinate amount of my childhood racing cars around them and using them as fortifications for army men. 
I also spent a lot of time rummaging through and slamming doors and drawers to other cabinets and bureaus similarly outfitted…I believe now I probably loosened the hinges and dovetail joints on a half-dozen Duncan Phyfe pieces by the time I was eleven.  My grandmother was a patient woman.
The name Duncan Phyfe might not sound familiar in today’s world, but in the first half of the nineteenth century he was absolutely the man to have in your house, or at least his furniture was.  If you enjoy ornate, gilded, fabulously lined furniture then a Phyfe should be on your wish list. 
If you’re in New York City between now and the first week of May, stop by the Met for a retrospective and show.  In the meantime go to 1stdibs for a D.F. primer.

I’ve never met an animal I didn’t like which might explain why I was so fascinated with the feet/paws of several tables in my grandparent’s house; I spent an inordinate amount of my childhood racing cars around them and using them as fortifications for army men. 

I also spent a lot of time rummaging through and slamming doors and drawers to other cabinets and bureaus similarly outfitted…I believe now I probably loosened the hinges and dovetail joints on a half-dozen Duncan Phyfe pieces by the time I was eleven.  My grandmother was a patient woman.

The name Duncan Phyfe might not sound familiar in today’s world, but in the first half of the nineteenth century he was absolutely the man to have in your house, or at least his furniture was.  If you enjoy ornate, gilded, fabulously lined furniture then a Phyfe should be on your wish list. 

If you’re in New York City between now and the first week of May, stop by the Met for a retrospective and show.  In the meantime go to 1stdibs for a D.F. primer.

Notes 2

Every man knows the secret to a happy home is a happy wife. But what if you can’t afford the perfect gift for your Valentine this year? We’ve got a solution - Earn fast cash!  Scour your attic, garage, and basement for old goodies to sell. Then come on Pawnathon Canada to sell your items. And be sure to bring your wife too!

Vintage valentines and tin are available at RecycleBuyVintage, via Etsy.

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